Chinese officials break into woman’s home and beat her corgi to death while she was in quarantine

Chinese officials break into womans home and beat her corgi


Chinese health workers wearing hazmat suits have executed a corgi in the name of pandemic protocols while the dog’s owner was undertaking Covid quarantine.

The government officials bashed the animal’s head with a crowbar after entering the home in Shangrao in southeastern Jiangxi province on Friday, shocking video shows.

The corgi’s owner, named only as Fu, was undergoing compulsory quarantine in a nearby hotel at the time, even though she is negative for Covid and the dog was never even tested.

Chinese health workers wearing hazmat suits have executed a corgi in the name of pandemic protocols while the dog's owner was undertaking Covid quarantine

Chinese health workers wearing hazmat suits have executed a corgi in the name of pandemic protocols while the dog’s owner was undertaking Covid quarantine

The killing was the latest example of the horrifying lengths China is going to in order to achieve Zero Covid.

Fu had been ordered to leave her home after positive cases were detected in her residential compound.

Just hours later, CCTV footage showed two pandemic workers entering the living room wielding a crowbar and a plastic bag.

One of them is heard asking: ‘Did the leader say we need to settle it right here on the spot?’

The other then replies: ‘Yes.’

He then approaches the corgi which is hiding under a table and whacks it in the head with the crowbar, causing it to whimper and run into another room.

The government officials bashed the animal's head with a crowbar after entering the home in Shangrao in southeastern Jiangxi province on Friday, shocking video shows

The government officials bashed the animal’s head with a crowbar after entering the home in Shangrao in southeastern Jiangxi province on Friday, shocking video shows

The killing was the latest example of the horrifying lengths China is going to in order to achieve Zero Covid

The killing was the latest example of the horrifying lengths China is going to in order to achieve Zero Covid

The video was shared by the dog’s owner and depicts the moments before the corgi was killed.

A district government official said the workers were instructed to disinfect the home but were forced to apologise to Fu for carrying out the ‘decontamination treatment’ on the dog.

It is not yet clear if they were following orders to kill the dog. 

Chinese authorities are under pressure to curb rising infections as the Delta variant continues to spread.

So far, around 1,300 cases have been recorded across two thirds of the country’s provinces.

The execution has sparked debate about the draconian methods to stamp out the virus as well as animal rights issues.

The video was shared by the dog's owner and depicts the moments before the corgi was killed

The video was shared by the dog’s owner and depicts the moments before the corgi was killed

All residents in the complex were ordered to enter quarantine on Friday and leave their pets behind at home.

Fu said workers had repeatedly told her they would not take away or kill the dog in her absence.

She wrote in a since-deleted post: ‘The dog tried to avoid the beating and fled into the bedroom, and therefore it wasn’t recorded by surveillance camera, but (I) could hear faint wails. 

‘A few minutes later, they said they’ve dealt with it and would take it away, holding a yellow plastic bag in their hands.’   

‘Even now I don’t know whether my dog is alive or dead, and where it has been taken.’

Since her post, the local government said the dog was killed as part of plans to ‘thoroughly disinfect’ the community.

They added the workers had ‘safely disposed’ of the dog without having communicated with the owner.

Chinese authorities are under pressure to curb rising infections as the Delta variant continues to spread

Chinese authorities are under pressure to curb rising infections as the Delta variant continues to spread

The pair have since been removed from their positions and apologised to the owner, local authorities said.

But Fu claims she was pressured by government officials and her employer to delete her online posts.

In September, three cats in China were killed after testing positive for the virus, again without the owner’s consent.

Some animals have contracted the virus, normally via humans, but there is no evidence they are playing a significant role in its spread.

The Chinese Communist Party is responding to outbreaks by locking down entire neighbourhoods, forcing them into quarantine and carrying out mass testing as part of its Zero Covid strategy.

But Beijing has no Covid policy regarding pets and some local authorities have allowed owners to take animals with them in quarantine while others have put in strict measures.

The corgi’s death has sparked outrage, with the hashtag #IspeakupfortheCorgiinShangrao trending online in protest against the killing.   

ANIMALS AND THEIR IMPACT ON COVID-19 

The exact source of Covid-19 is unknown, according to the CDC, ‘but we know that it originally came from an animal, likely a bat.’

At this time, there is no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the virus, the CDC added.

Studies suggest that while animals can develop virus antibodies, the risk of passing it to humans, or between other animals is very low.

‘We are still learning about this virus, but we know that it can spread from people to animals in some situations, especially during close contact,’ the CDC has warned.

‘People with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should avoid contact with animals, including pets, livestock, and wildlife.’

There is a risk of animals, particularly domestic pets, becoming a ‘reservoir’ for the virus, allowing it to be spread back to humans even after it has been removed from human populations. 

Dogs become infected in the same way as humans do, by inhaling droplets after an infected person coughs or sneezes.

There have been a handful of cases around the world and almost all appear to have caught it off their owners.

The first dog to catch Covid was a 17-year-old Pomeranian that tested positive in Hong Kong. It was quarantined by authorities.

There is no evidence that animals transmit it to humans, with research suggesting they do not ‘shed’ enough virus to be infectious.

However, Government scientists have warned that animals could act as ‘fomites’, in the same way as surfaces such as door handles do.

For example, if an infected person coughed on their dog, the virus could survive on its fur and be passed to another person when they stroke it.



Source link

Share:
Avatar of Bourbiza Mohamed

Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

Heartless romance fraudster 28 who fleeced two women is jailed

‘Heartless’ romance fraudster, 28, who fleeced two women is jailed for four years

India reopens to vaccinated travelers as more Asian countries loosen

India reopens to vaccinated travelers as more Asian countries loosen travel rules.