Fascinating images show Chatsworth house in all its glory following its £32.7million restoration

Fascinating images show Chatsworth house in all its glory following


These remarkable photographs capture one of England’s grandest stately homes, Chatsworth House, in all its glory following its ‘Masterplan’ restoration – which involved it being encased in scaffolding, re-gilding the windows and removing three centuries worth of grime.

Taken by photographer Victoria Hely-Hutchinson, who has worked with Stella McCartney and Vogue, the spectacular images feature in a new book celebrating the completion of the Derbyshire home’s 10-year refurbishment programme, which cost more than £32million. 

Chatsworth, Arcadia, Now tells the story of the extraordinary place – made famous as ‘Pemberley’ from the 2005 film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice – through seven scenes from its life, alongside a stunning photographic portrait of the house and its collections, captured at a ‘moment of high optimism in its long history’. 

In a foreword for the book, the owners, the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, both 77, say: ‘We lived at Chatsworth throughout the Masterplan, using different rooms as the work progressed. 

‘For two years our bedroom was in the attics; there are eighty-two steps from the ground floor to the top, so it was better not to leave your spectacles upstairs in the morning.’

These remarkable photographs capture one of England's grandest stately homes, Chatsworth House (pictured), in all its glory following its 'Masterplan' restoration

Part of Chatsworth House, pictured, following the restoration

Looking brand new: These remarkable photographs capture one of England’s grandest stately homes, Chatsworth House (pictured), in all its glory following its ‘Masterplan’ restoration

Given a facelift: The revamp involved the home (pictured) being encased in scaffolding, re-gilding the windows and removing three centuries worth of grime

Given a facelift: The revamp involved the home (pictured) being encased in scaffolding, re-gilding the windows and removing three centuries worth of grime

Taken by photographer Victoria Hely-Hutchinson, who has worked with Stella McCartney and Vogue, the spectacular images feature in a new book celebrating the completion of the Derbyshire home's 10-year refurbishment programme, which cost more than £32million

One of the lavish rooms at Chatsworth following the million-pound revamp

Taken by photographer Victoria Hely-Hutchinson, who has worked with Stella McCartney and Vogue, the spectacular images feature in a new book celebrating the completion of the Derbyshire home’s 10-year refurbishment programme, which cost more than £32million

The facelift of Chatsworth – during which the home was encased in scaffolding, the ‘grime from three centuries’ exposure to the Derbyshire elements was removed from its stone façade’, and the window frames on the South and West Fronts were re-gilded – included the installation of a lift serving all floors. 

‘These building works – the majority of them hidden from sight – were necessary from a physical point of view, so that the fabric and services in most parts of the house are now in better condition than for a very long time,’ said the Duke and Duchess.

‘The work also marked the final part of a gradual alteration in the use and purpose of the house, a change that started after the Second World War, when my parents came to realise that Chatsworth’s future lay more as a tourist destination than as a private house occasionally open to visitors.’

They added: ‘The overriding impression of Chatsworth is one of peace. The house is entirely benign, the views are wonderfully calm, and a sense of optimism prevails. We are constantly aware of the layers of time and history.’

Chatsworth, Arcadia, Now tells the story of the extraordinary place (pictured) - made famous as 'Pemberley' from the 2005 film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice - through seven scenes from its life

It includes a stunning photographic portrait of the house and its collections, captured at a 'moment of high optimism in its long history'

Chatsworth, Arcadia, Now tells the story of the extraordinary place (pictured) – made famous as ‘Pemberley’ from the 2005 film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice – through seven scenes from its life, alongside a stunning photographic portrait of the house and its collections, captured at a ‘moment of high optimism in its long history’

In a foreword for the book, the owners of the home (pictured is one of its grand rooms), the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, both 77, say: 'We lived at Chatsworth throughout the Masterplan, using different rooms as the work progressed'

In a foreword for the book, the owners of the home (pictured is one of its grand rooms), the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, both 77, say: ‘We lived at Chatsworth throughout the Masterplan, using different rooms as the work progressed’

The facelift of Chatsworth - during which the home (pictured is one of its dining rooms) was encased in scaffolding, the 'grime from three centuries' exposure to the Derbyshire elements was removed from its stone façade', and the window frames on the South and West Fronts were re-gilded - included the installation of a lift serving all floors

The facelift of Chatsworth – during which the home (pictured is one of its dining rooms) was encased in scaffolding, the ‘grime from three centuries’ exposure to the Derbyshire elements was removed from its stone façade’, and the window frames on the South and West Fronts were re-gilded – included the installation of a lift serving all floors

'These building works - the majority of them hidden from sight - were necessary from a physical point of view, so that the fabric and services in most parts of the house are now in better condition than for a very long time,' said the Duke and Duchess. Pictured, a seating area with a view to outside

The splendid grounds surrounding the home, pictured

‘These building works – the majority of them hidden from sight – were necessary from a physical point of view, so that the fabric and services in most parts of the house are now in better condition than for a very long time,’ said the Duke and Duchess. Pictured left, a seating area with a view to outside, and right, the splendid grounds

The makeover results were truly dazzling, not least due to the amount of gold used to ‘bling’ it up; around 1,500 sheets of gold leaf were used for each window frame on the west and south terraces, as well as on roof ornaments, gates and other railings.

Chatsworth House, which has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549, reopened its doors in 2018 following its biggest restoration project in 200 years.

The 10-year long programme saw ‘priceless’ paintings restored, brickwork scrubbed and turrets rebuilt. Dentistry tools were apparently used to scrape out mortar in between huge blocks in the Derbyshire stately home’s walls.

Chatsworth House, which has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549, reopened its doors in 2018 following its biggest restoration project in 200 years. Pictured, some of the sculptures at the stately home

Chatsworth House, which has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549, reopened its doors in 2018 following its biggest restoration project in 200 years. Pictured, some of the sculptures at the stately home

The 10-year long programme saw 'priceless' paintings restored, brickwork scrubbed and turrets rebuilt. Dentistry tools were apparently used to scrape out mortar in between huge blocks in the Derbyshire stately home's walls. Pictured, a modern snap of one of the corridors in the building

The stunning outside scenes on the estate, pictured

The 10-year long programme saw ‘priceless’ paintings restored, brickwork scrubbed and turrets rebuilt. Dentistry tools were apparently used to scrape out mortar in between huge blocks in the Derbyshire stately home’s walls. Pictured left, a modern snap of one of the corridors in the building, and right, the stunning outside scenes on the estate

The photographer captured the stunning estate throughout different seasons, with this image showcasing the spectacular grounds in the Peak District covered in fog

The photographer captured the stunning estate throughout different seasons, with this image showcasing the spectacular grounds in the Peak District covered in fog

Chatsworth (pictured surrounded by its grounds) opens each year from late March through to Christmas and closes in early January. Throughout the makeover period, it remained open to the public, with different sections shut off

Chatsworth (pictured surrounded by its grounds) opens each year from late March through to Christmas and closes in early January. Throughout the makeover period, it remained open to the public, with different sections shut off

The house and garden were built by Sir William Cavendish and Bess of Hardwick in 1555. There are 126 rooms. More than 600,000 people a year flock to the historic property in the Peak District.

Chatsworth opens each year from late March through to Christmas and closes in early January. Throughout the makeover period, it remained open to the public, with different sections shut off. 

In 2018, The Daily Mail reported that the renovation was partly carried out because the Duke of Devonshire had no wifi, which in turn triggered the costly refurbishment.

Chatsworth, Arcadia, Now by the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire with John-Paul Stonard, and photography by Victoria Hely-Hutchinson, is published in hardback by Particular Books, priced £50.00 

The house and garden were built by Sir William Cavendish and Bess of Hardwick in 1555. There are 126 rooms. More than 600,000 people a year flock to the historic property in the Peak District. Pictured, Chatsworth before the renovation was completed

The house and garden were built by Sir William Cavendish and Bess of Hardwick in 1555. There are 126 rooms. More than 600,000 people a year flock to the historic property in the Peak District. Pictured, Chatsworth before the renovation was completed

The makeover results were truly dazzling, not least due to the amount of gold used to 'bling' it up; around 1,500 sheets of gold leaf were used for each window frame on the west and south terraces, as well as on roof ornaments, gates and other railings. Pictured, the home after its revamp

Chatsworth before its makeover, pictured

The makeover results were truly dazzling, not least due to the amount of gold used to ‘bling’ it up; around 1,500 sheets of gold leaf were used for each window frame on the west and south terraces, as well as on roof ornaments, gates and other railings. Pictured left, the home after its revamp, and right, before the makeover



Source link

Share:
Avatar of Bourbiza Mohamed

Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

GIPHY App Key not set. Please check settings

Vaccinated vs Unvaccinated Europes Covid Culture War

Vaccinated vs. Unvaccinated: Europe’s Covid Culture War

Jacob Blakes family says he is learning to walk again

Jacob Blake’s family says he is learning to walk again at Chicago facility