Australian lollipop lady reveals how much they REALLY make a week – and cons that accompany role

Australian lollipop lady reveals how much they REALLY make a


Australian lollipop lady reveals how much they REALLY make a week – and the major con about the job that no one’s talking about

  • Maria Kefalas, 21, has revealed work as a lollypop lady comes with its challenges
  • The Melbourne resident worked casually at construction sites across the state
  • In a TikTok video, Ms Kefalas also dismissed rumours the work was easy money
  • She also told Daily Mail Australia she was objectified by tradies at many job sites 










A fired up Australian lollipop lady has opened up about what she makes in a week and revealed the major con about the job no one talks about.

Melbourne woman Maria Kefalas, 21, vented on social media about the job that is often seen as ‘easy money’.

‘I’ve been seeing a lot of TikTok (videos) in regards to traffic control, and they are all positive,’ she rants in her post.

‘They tell you how much money they make and how many hours they work.

‘They are giving people false hope about traffic control… it has got to be the most inconsistent job I have ever done in my life.’

Melbourne resident Maria Kefalas, 21, has dismissed talk work in traffic control is easy money

Melbourne resident Maria Kefalas, 21, has dismissed talk work in traffic control is easy money

She also revealed to Daily Mail Australia she was often harassed at job sites across Melbourne

She also revealed to Daily Mail Australia she was often harassed at job sites across Melbourne 

Ms Kefalas goes on to reveal speculation that lollipop ladies repeatedly earn $2000 a week working from Monday to Friday as pure fantasy given all traffic control workers in Australia are employed casually.

‘Some weeks yes, I had five days of work – but then I was off for two weeks,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

‘On other occasions I had phone calls at 11pm asking me to be on a job site at 6am the following day or to drive two hours out of Melbourne on short notice for a 12 hour shift.

‘It isn’t a stable income by any means.’ 

Her advice for Australians considering a career in traffic control was to join a union.

‘That is where they have all the money – if you get rained off, they pay for it and you’ll have consistent work,’ she said.

‘Otherwise don’t do it.’

She went on to tell Daily Mail Australia there is also a dark side to the industry.

‘On many occasions I had tradies yell out disgusting comments to me,’ Ms Kefalas said.

‘Saying what they wanted to do to me and how I looked in my uniform…it also came from other people driving past.’ 

Numerous people online sympathised with Ms Kefalas, whose shifts saw her standing for up to 12 hours at a time.

One said ‘let’s not forget standing in 40 degree weather and nearly having a heat stroke’ as a significant downside of the job with another pointing out ‘this girl said nothing but straight facts’.

Not everyone was prepared to be sympathetic towards Ms Kefalas, with one stating ‘if you don’t like rain, get another job’.

Ms Kefalas has since secured fulltime work in another industry. 

Maria Kefalas pointed out working in testing temperatures as a lollipop lady was part of the job

Maria Kefalas pointed out working in testing temperatures as a lollipop lady was part of the job

Maria Kefalas confirmed the work wasn't consistent - and she was often called to remote job sites with little notice (stock image)

Maria Kefalas confirmed the work wasn’t consistent – and she was often called to remote job sites with little notice (stock image)



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Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

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