Sydneysider’s love-hate relationship with their city exposed as residents slam mediocre nightlife


The love-hate relationship Sydneysiders share with their city has been exposed as residents slam the mediocre nightlife but praise health care and low crime rates. 

The once-enviable harbourside city was ranked one of the worst party destinations in the world in a new report commissioned by the Committee for Sydney. 

The Benchmarking Sydney’s Performance Report 2021 revealed how residents really feel about the city’s student experience, health care, crime rates, and liveability. 

Chief executive Gabriel Metcalf put dissatisfaction with Sydney nightlife down to the recently-abolished lock-out laws and the Covid-19 pandemic. 

The harbourside city has ranked one of the worst party destinations across the world in a new report commissioned by the Committee of Sydney (young Sydneysiders enjoy a night out)

The harbourside city has ranked one of the worst party destinations across the world in a new report commissioned by the Committee of Sydney (young Sydneysiders enjoy a night out)

The love-hate relationship Sydneysiders (pictured) share with their city has been exposed as residents slam the mediocre nightlife but praise health care and low crime rates

The love-hate relationship Sydneysiders (pictured) share with their city has been exposed as residents slam the mediocre nightlife but praise health care and low crime rates

‘Sydney’s reputation for being a fun place to go out at night has taken a dive over the past seven years,’ he told the Daily Telegraph. 

‘The impacts on our night-life are starting to show up in some of the key global rankings that drive foreign investment in our city.’ 

The city was judged across 12 areas that residents felt Sydney was doing well in and others that could be improved. 

The report found Sydneysiders were proud of their city’s health care and safety, rail infrastructure, and life sciences. 

The city ranked fourth in the world for student experiences and was graded number one for having the best gender pay equality. 

However, Sydney lost points on air pollution, use of renewable energy, and foreign investment and business friendliness. 

Chief executive of the committee Gabriel Metcalf put Sydneysider's dissatisfaction with the city's nightlife down to lock-out laws and the Covid-19 pandemic (pictured, Sydney in June)

Chief executive of the committee Gabriel Metcalf put Sydneysider’s dissatisfaction with the city’s nightlife down to lock-out laws and the Covid-19 pandemic (pictured, Sydney in June)

The report card found Sydneysiders were proud of their city's health care and safety, rail infrastructure and life sciences (pictured, health care workers in Sydney in August)

The report card found Sydneysiders were proud of their city’s health care and safety, rail infrastructure and life sciences (pictured, health care workers in Sydney in August)

Unsurprisingly, the harbourside city ranked in the bottom three for housing affordability behind cities like Toronto, London and Miami. 

Residents were most unsatisfied with Sydney’s mediocre nightlife and the city was voted the second-worst party destination in the world. 

NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet was optimistic the city would find its feet after spending 106 days in lockdown. 

He said government initiatives like the Dine & Discover vouchers and the Open for Lunch events would see ‘night-life burst to new heights’. 

‘The hugely successful Long Lunch event in Sydney and Parramatta last week also saw a huge response from people wanting to get out in the CBD to recover their social lives after Covid restrictions, and I’m confident this will translate into night time activities as well,’ he claimed. 

Residents were most unsatisfied with Sydney's mediocre nightlife with the city voted the second-worst party destination in the world (pictured, residents in Barangaroo in October)

Residents were most unsatisfied with Sydney’s mediocre nightlife with the city voted the second-worst party destination in the world (pictured, residents in Barangaroo in October)

The global city ranked fourth in the world for student experiences and was graded number one for having the best gender pay equality (pictured, the University of New South Wales)

The global city ranked fourth in the world for student experiences and was graded number one for having the best gender pay equality (pictured, the University of New South Wales)

NSW Minister for Customer Service Victor Dominello last month announced two new $25 vouchers would soon be available to residents to spend up in their city.

The $250 million investment from the state government will encourage millions of residents to help support businesses after months of Covid-19 restrictions. 

Since March, 4.8 million residents participated in the voucher program injecting over $430 million into struggling businesses. 

The cash splash comes as the premier announced the government will lift restrictions on masks, QR codes, density limits and proof of vaccination rules ahead of the summer festive season. 

Radical new changes to Covid rules in NSW will come into place when the state hits 95 per cent double vaccinated or on December 15, whichever comes first.  

Proof of vaccination certificates will soon ditched for most activities except for indoor music festivals with more than 1,000 people (pictured, bar-goers in Sydney in October)

Proof of vaccination certificates will soon ditched for most activities except for indoor music festivals with more than 1,000 people (pictured, bar-goers in Sydney in October)

Radical new changes to Covid rules in NSW will come into place when the state hits 95 per cent double vaccinated or on December 15, whichever comes first

Radical new changes to Covid rules in NSW will come into place when the state hits 95 per cent double vaccinated or on December 15, whichever comes first

QR code check-ins will only be required for ‘high risk venues’ such as hospitals, gyms, airports, aged care facilities and limited hospitality venues.

Masks will only be required on public transport and planes, at airports, and for indoor hospitality staff who aren’t vaccinated.

Proof of vaccination certificates will be ditched for most activities except for indoor music festivals with more than 1,000 people. 

‘We’re leading the world when it comes to vaccinations and that is a tremendous achievement we can all be proud of because it has allowed us to return to normal as quickly and safely as possible,’ Mr Perrottet said.

‘The easing of these restrictions will allow people to get out and enjoy summer providing a boost for some of our hardest industries as we do everything we can to ensure we keep people safe as we learn to live with Covid.’



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Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

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